Sunday 28 May 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 05/24/17)
When U.S. President Donald Trump and other leaders of the world's seven major industrialized nations gather in Sicily on Friday, they will enjoy a spectacular view of the Mediterranean Sea, but won't get any glimpse of boats full of migrants. A common sight off Sicily in recent years, the authorities have banned all migrant landings on the island during the Group of Seven Summit for security reasons, telling rescue vessels that pick them up at sea to take them to the mainland during the two-day meeting. Out of sight does not mean out of mind. Italy chose to host the summit in Taormina, on the cliffs of eastern Sicily, to concentrate minds on Europe's migrant...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/23/17)
Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa. Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an isolated tooth, may be the oldest-known member of the human lineage that began after an evolutionary split from the line that led to chimpanzees, our closest cousins. The jawbone, which included teeth, was unearthed in 1944 in Athens. The premolar was found in south-central Bulgaria in 2009. The researchers examined them using sophisticated new techniques including CT scans and established their age...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/20/17)
France will step up the fight against resurgent Islamist militants in north and west Africa and will work more closely with Germany to help the tinderbox region, President Emmanuel Macron said on his first trip outside Europe on Friday. Visiting Mali days after taking office, Macron vowed to keep French troops in the Sahel region until there was "no more Islamist terrorism" there. He said operations would be escalated in response to signs that militant groups were regrouping and uniting...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/18/17)
Malawi is planning to take its dispute with Tanzania over Lake Malawi, with its potentially massive reserves of oil and gas, to the International Court of Justice in the Hague, the foreign affairs minister said on Wednesday. Malawi, at the west of Africa's third largest lake, claims the entire northern half of the lake while Tanzania, to the east, says it owns half of the northern area. The southern half is shared between Malawi and Mozambique. Gas finds in the region have made the 50-year-old row over territory between Tanzania and Malawi more intense. "The government of Malawi has been committed to the mediation process and peaceful resolution of the dispute through
(Reuters (Eng) 05/17/17)
Gay and lesbian Africans who fled abuse in their home countries face a "culture of disbelief" which makes their experience of seeking asylum in Britain traumatic, a Nigerian lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender rights (LGBT) campaigner said. Aderonke Apata, 50, who fled persecution in Nigeria, said the practice of assessing Africans' sexual orientation claims based on Western standards was problematic. "They expect an LGBT person to have used sex toys, to go to gay clubs," Apata, an asylum seeker who founded...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/13/17)
Tackling climate change in Africa could help resolve multiple problems ravaging the continent, from drought to refugees and violence, the head of the African Union said on Friday. The mix of global warming with economic woes and political conflicts keeps peace from taking hold, said Moussa Faki Mahamat, the Union's new chairman, at Chatham House, an international think tank. "There is a link between climate change and prosperity, as well as peace, on the continent," Mahamat said in French with...
(Fox News 05/10/17)
After five years of no major attacks on merchant vessels, piracy around the Horn of Africa seemed to be on hiatus. Acts of piracy in those treacherous waters have fallen sharply since 2012, according to statistics released by the United States Navy. The Navy credits aggressive patrolling by international forces and increased vigilance by the commercial shipping industry for the decrease. However, in the past month, Somali pirates have intercepted five ships, raising concerns that piracy has returned to the...
(AFP (eng) 05/09/17)
Four wild elephants from nearby forests paid an unexpected visit to a university in Tanzania's capital on Tuesday, triggering more entertainment than panic before being chased away by rangers. "When we saw them in the morning, we were initially afraid and informed the university officials," said Jessica Mollel, a student at the University of Dodoma, who said a crowd quickly formed. The students called the police who got in touch with officers from Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA). "Immediately alerted, the police arrived to contain the curious
(Xinhuanet 05/08/17)
Tanzanian Vice President Samia Suluhu Hassan is on Monday expected to lead mourners in public viewing and paying last respects to Arusha school bus accident victims. The mournful event will take place at the Sheikh Amri Abeid stadium at the heart of Arusha city, according to Mrisho Gambo, Arusha Regional Commissioner. He said that the Vice President will be accompanied by ministers, senior government officials and members of Parliament. Gambo said that earlier, the event was planned for Sunday, but...
(AFP (eng) 05/07/17)
A bus crash in Tanzania that claimed the lives of 32 primary school pupils, two teachers and the driver was likely caused by speeding, police said. "Preliminary investigations show that the accident is due to speeding," regional police chief Charles Mkumbo told the state-run Tanzania Broadcasting Corporation late on Saturday. Some reports said the people on the bus were not wearing seat belts at the time of the crash. The accident happened early on Saturday when the bus went off the road and into the Marera river gorge in Karatu district near the northern city of Arusha where the children were attending Lucky Vincent Primary School.
(AFP (eng) 05/04/17)
Tanzania has extradited an indicted drug kingpin accused of overseeing a global heroin and cocaine smuggling network to the United States, the American embassy in Dar es Salaam said. The US government had last year claimed that Ali Khatib Haji Hassan, a Tanzanian national nicknamed "Shkuba," was "a major international drug kingpin." The embassy said late Wednesday the 44-year-old had been extradited on Monday along with two of his associates, Iddy Salehe Mfullu and Tiko Emanual Adam. All three face...
(Daily Monitor 05/04/17)
Kampala — Uganda and Tanzania trail behind the rest of the East African countries on the score card sheet when it comes to the implementation of gender policies and law, a new study reveals. The report titled: "The EAC Pilot Gender Barometer and Challenges in Information Gap" score card is largely based on how citizens perceive governments in terms of existence of laws and policies and their effective implementation. The report launched on May 5, in Kampala during the East...
(AFP (eng) 05/03/17)
Press freedom in Tanzania is being squeezed under President John Magufuli, leaving journalists fearful. France-based watchdog Reporters Without Borders (known by its French acronym, RSF) ranked Tanzania 83rd out of 180 countries in its latest annual press freedom report. The East African country was down a dozen places from the previous year, representing the second-largest decline in the world, after Nicaragua. Magufuli, nicknamed "tingatinga" -- meaning "bulldozer" in Swahili -- was elected in October 2015. His talent for publicity-grabbing stunts that bolster his reputation as a no-nonsense
(Voice of America 05/03/17)
African military expenditures have finally slowed down after more than a decade of steady increases, according to a new report on global defense spending. The main reason, the report found, is a drop in oil prices. “The sharp decreases in oil prices has affected quite a number of African countries, namely South Sudan and Angola. This has kind of driven almost the entire regional trend,” said Nan Tian, a researcher at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute’s (SIPRI) Arms and...
(Tanzania Daily News 05/02/17)
74,963 candidates registered to sit for the National Form Six Examinations are expected to sweat it out across the country, beginning this morning. National Council for Technical Education (NACTE) Executive Secretary Charles Msonde disclosed in Dar es Salaam yesterday that 63,102 of the candidates are in formal schools-- 38,618 of them boys and 24,484 are girls. He said the rest, 11,861, were private candidates made up of 7,652 males and 4,209 females, and that the examinations are expecting to end...
(The Citizen 04/28/17)
President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Speaking after receiving a report on public servants certificates verification, Dr Magufuli said salaries for the 9,000 plus employees for this month should be withheld. He directed the Prime Minister, Kassim Majaliwa that posts which were being held by the fake certificates holders should be announced immediately. "They are thieves like any other thieves... you cannot perform if you don't have deserving qualifications," he said. He further ordered that other civil servants whose certificates have been found with discrepancies should be treated legally "so that they could be jailed
(The Citizen 04/28/17)
Attacks on journalists and state threats to media houses have played a major role is seeing Tanzania significantly drop 12 places in the new press freedom rankings, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) said yesterday. According to the 2017 World Press Freedom Index (WPFI) report, the other factors that contributed to the drop are the suspension and closures of media outlets, especially during elections. "The climate has not improved since President John Magufuli's election in 2015. Nicknamed the 'Bulldozer', he tolerates no...
(Xinhuanet 04/28/17)
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has released fund to support Tanzania's endeavor of carrying out a countrywide food shortage assessment. The assessment will involve data collection from rural farmers so as to establish the amount of food shortage in the east African nation. FAO program officer Silvia Tirweshobwa said on Thursday the program is geared to establish the exact statistics on food shortage, so as to have sustainable planning. Under the program, 336,000 U.S. dollars...
(The Citizen 04/28/17)
The government has admitted that it has no capacity to offer employment opportunities all youth who are graduating from higher learning institutions. The admission was made on Friday morning in the Parliament by deputy minister of State in the Prime Minister's office dealing with Labour, Youth and Employment, Mr Anthony Mavunde, during question and answers session. He was responding a basic question from Special Seat Member of Parliament, Ms Ester Mmasi (CCM), who sought to know why the government shouldn't...
(Voice of America 04/28/17)
A low-cost and widely available drug could save the lives of 1 in 3 mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a new study. Severe bleeding, known as postpartum hemorrhage, or PPH, is the leading cause of maternal death worldwide, killing more than 100,000 women every year. Even for mothers who survive, it is a painful and traumatic experience. The world's poorest countries, especially in Africa and India, are the worst hit. Drug from 1960s But...

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