| Africatime
Sunday 26 March 2017
(AFP (eng) 03/25/17)
A jihadist accused of masterminding a deadly attack in Ivory Coast is also suspected of having planned a major assault in Burkina Faso's capital last year, a senior official said Friday. Ivorian officials believe Mimi Ould Baba Ould Cheikh organised the gun and grenade attack that left 19 people dead last March at the beach resort of Grand-Bassam, which is popular with foreigners. Now he is also believed to have been "head of operations" for the attack on a hotel and cafe in Ouagadougou in January 2016 that killed 30 people, said Colonel Serge Alain Ouedraogo of the Burkinabe gendarmerie. "The weapons and equipment for the attack were carefully hidden in the tyre of a...
(AFP (eng) 03/25/17)
The first soldiers of a United Nations-mandated regional military force are set to be deployed to South Sudan within about a month, the outgoing UN official in charge of peacekeeping said Friday. "The vanguard element of the force will be deployed between end of April, beginning of May," Herve Ladsous, the UN under-secretary-general for peacekeeping operations, told reporters. The first contingent of soldiers to the African country will come from Bangladesh and Nepal, Ladsous said, adding the deployment will include a helicopter unit. Other troops, notably Ethiopians, are expected to arrive in late May or early June.
(AFP (eng) 03/25/17)
At least 50 people have been killed and dozens more injured since Tuesday after armed men attacked three villages in the central Bambari region of the Central African Republic, local residents who fled their homes told AFP. Prosper Tchoulekrayo, who escaped from Yasseneme village, said the attackers had "fired indiscriminately on the inhabitants". "The provisional toll of the attacks in the Agoudou Manga, Yasseneme and Ngouyanza is at least 50 dead. Dozens more have been injured," said Isaac Arata-Naba, an Agoudou Manga resident. Tchoulekrayo said the attacks were staged by members of the UPC, a faction of the former rebel and mainly Muslim Seleka movement "which is continuing
(AFP (eng) 03/24/17)
Egypt's ousted president Hosni Mubarak left a military hospital on Friday where he had spent much of his six-year detention, his lawyer said. Mubarak had been cleared for release earlier this month after a top court finally acquitted him of involvement in protester deaths during the 2011 revolt that ousted him. "Yes," his lawyer Farid al-Deeb told AFP when asked if Mubarak had left the hospital on Friday. Mubarak was accused of inciting the deaths of protesters during the 18-day...
(AFP (eng) 03/24/17)
At least 20 people were killed this week as fighting erupted between armed militias in a uranium-rich region of the Central African Republic, a military source said Thursday. Most of the victims were civilians caught up in battles between Christian anti-balaka (anti-machete) militiamen and fighters from the mainly Muslim Seleka in and around the southeastern town of Bakouma, the source said. The final death toll from the violence, which erupted at the start of the week, could be even higher...
(AFP (eng) 03/24/17)
The pregnant Rwandan-British wife of an exiled opposition official appeared in a Kigali court Thursday accused of seeking to form an armed group and revealing state secrets. Violette Uwamahoro, who moved to the United Kingdom in 2004, went to Rwanda for her father's funeral and then disappeared on February 14. Her husband, exiled in the UK, said she had been kidnapped due to his political activities while Amnesty International warned against efforts to "quell opposition voices" ahead of August presidential...
(AFP (eng) 03/24/17)
Judges at the International Criminal Court are expected on Friday to unveil the first compensation awards to victims of war crimes, with lawyers estimating a 2003 attack on a Congolese village caused $16.4 million in damage. Friday's order for reparations for 304 victims of former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga is set to be a landmark step for the tribunal, set up in 2002 to prosecute the world's worst crimes. Katanga was sentenced by the ICC to 12 years in jail...
(AFP (eng) 03/24/17)
The UN Security Council voiced alarm Thursday about the deepening humanitarian crisis and famine in South Sudan, with the United States, Britain and France raising anew the idea of sanctions and a weapons embargo. Attacks on humanitarian and UN missions, serial rapes, recruitment of child soldiers and famine: Six years after independence, "all the optimism that accompanied the birth of South Sudan has been shattered by internal divisions, rivalries and the irresponsible behavior of some of its leaders," said UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. "Despite the alarm sounded by the United Nations and the international community over this crisis
(APA 03/23/17)
Human Rights Watch on Thursday issued a report in Bangui decrying the disruption of schooling for many Central African children thanks to the marauding activities of armed militias still roaming the war-ravaged country. Img : CAR: Armed militias keeping children away from school - HRW “These armed groups lay siege, plunder and ransack schools, thus preventing children from attending classes in the Central African Republic," HRW lamented. It also claimed the peacekeepers also use school buildings as bases or barracks. "Soldiers occupying schools and dismantling desks for firewood is rife in parts of CAR," the human rights defense body complained in its 43-page report entitled “No Courses When
(AFP (eng) 03/23/17)
An Egyptian court sentenced on Wednesday six policemen to jail for torturing a detainee to death, the latest such ruling after the government pledged to crack down on police abuses. The Cairo court sentenced an officer to five years in prison, another to one year, and four policemen to three years, a judicial official said. They had been convicted of beating to death Saed Said, a 26-year old accountant, in a police station in 2012. In July last year, a court in southern Egypt sentenced six policemen to prison for beating to death a 47-year old detainee.
(AFP (eng) 03/23/17)
The United Nations has raised less than a third of the funding needed to prevent famine in Somalia, a spokesman said Wednesday, ahead of a Security Council meeting on the crisis in the drought-hit country. The humanitarian crisis is worsening in Somalia with more than 300 deaths from cholera and diarrhea since the beginning of the year, according to UN figures. About $864 million is needed for Somalia this year and so far only 31 percent has been pledged, said UN spokesman Farhan Haq. The appeal is expected to be revised soon to take into account the growing needs stemming from the risk of famine
(Dw-World 03/23/17)
English-speaking Cameroon remains in upheaval as regional leaders are set to go on trial on Thursday accused of calling for secession. But why is President Paul Biya so afraid of granting more autonomy to Anglophones? Some activists in the northwest and southwest provinces, traditional bastions of opposition to the regime of long-time President Paul Biya, are calling for an independent state of Southern Cameroon. The region was once called that in British colonial times. But according to analysts, a vast majority of the Anglophone population prefers a federation, believing it to be the best
(AFP (eng) 03/23/17)
Ten Egyptian soldiers were killed in two roadside bombings as they clashed with Islamic State group jihadists in the Sinai Peninsula, the military said on Thursday. Fifteen jihadists were also killed in the fighting, the military said in a statement, without saying when the incidents took place. The military said the clashes broke out when soldiers raided "an extremely dangerous" jihadist hideout. It said soldiers found a cache of explosives and bombs ready for use as well as grenades and ammunition. The Islamic State group had said in a statement on Wednesday afternoon that it blew up two army vehicles during clashes
(The New Times 03/23/17)
Rwanda is prepared to send more peacekeepers to be part of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), the acting Defence and Military Spokesperson, Lt Col René Ngendahimana, has confirmed. He disclosed this yesterday after the U.N. peacekeeping chief, Hervé Ladsous said during a visit to South Sudan's capital, Juba, on Tuesday that the first peacekeepers from Rwanda, Nepal and Bangladesh will begin arriving in the next few weeks. "That is true. There is an additional force required by the UN and, Rwanda is ready to contribute an additional battalion," Ngendahimana told The New Times. Rwanda presently maintains 1,650 troops as part of UNMISS.
(AFP (eng) 03/22/17)
At least 46 people were killed and almost 100 others wounded in clashes between rival ethnic groups in southwest Nigeria earlier this month, police said on Wednesday. Special forces were deployed to the city of Ile-Ife in Osun state following two days of violence that broke out between local Yoruba and Hausa people on March 7, Nigeria's national police spokesman Moshood Jimoh told AFP. "The casualty figures are 46 dead and 96 wounded in the violence in Ile-Ife. Of those injured, 81 had been treated while 15 are still in the hospital," Jimoh said.
(AFP (eng) 03/22/17)
An Egyptian court sentenced on Wednesday six policemen to jail for torturing a detainee to death, the latest such ruling after the government pledged to crack down on police abuses. The Cairo court sentenced an officer to five years in prison, another to one year, and four policemen to three years, a judicial official said. They had been convicted of beating to death Saed Said, a 26-year old accountant, in a police station in 2012. In July last year, a...
(AFP (eng) 03/22/17)
Forces commanded by a Libyan military strongman fighting to oust jihadists from second city Benghazi may have committed war crimes, Human Rights Watch said Wednesday. The self-styled Libyan National Army, commanded by strongman Khalifa Haftar, controls much of eastern Libya and is battling an array of jihadist groups who seized Benghazi in 2014. The LNA announced on Saturday that "terrorist groups" had fled their last stronghold in Benghazi and that its forces were in full control of the city. Human Rights Watch said the LNA "may have committed war crimes, including killing and beating...
(AFP (eng) 03/22/17)
At least five people were killed when a minibus laden with explosives blew up in Mogadishu on Tuesday, just as the troubled country's new prime minister unveiled his government lineup. The blast, the latest attack in the Somali capital believed to be the work of Al-Qaeda linked Shabaab extremists, occurred at a checkpoint just 500 metres (yards) from the presidential palace. "The vehicle was stopped at the checkpoint for security screening when it went off. At least five people were...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/22/17)
Zimbabwean police deployed water cannon and anti-riot officers on the streets of the capital on Wednesday ahead of a planned demonstration by opposition parties against changes to the voter registration process. Anti-government protests in August descended into some of the worst violence seen in the southern African nation for two decades as anger over economic hardship boiled over. Opposition parties united under a National Election Reform Agenda (NERA) banner are campaigning against a government decision to take over the purchase...
(AFP (eng) 03/22/17)
The United Nations has approved an emergency loan of $22 million (20.3 million euros) in a bid to prevent another famine in drought and crisis-hit Somalia, its food agency said Tuesday. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) is releasing the funds to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in the hope it will help stave off catastrophe in the civil-war wracked country, just five years after the last famine. Somalia declared a national disaster last month as the number of people going hungry hit three million, with 6.2 million people in total expected to face acute food insecurity over the next three months.

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