| Africatime
Friday 28 April 2017
(AFP (eng) 04/28/17)
More than 95,000 South Sudanese have entered Sudan so far this year, the UN said Thursday, as thousands continue to flee war and famine in the world's youngest nation. South Sudan, which split from the north in 2011, has declared famine in parts of the country, saying a million people are on the brink of starvation. The number of South Sudanese refugees arriving in Sudan has surpassed 95,000 since the start of 2017, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Office, or OCHA, said in its latest bulletin. This brings the total number of South Sudanese refugees taking shelter in Sudan since a brutal civil war erupted in their country in December 2013...
(Xinhuanet 04/28/17)
The government of China on Thursday provided life saving nutrition assistance worth 8 million U.S. dollars to support the United Nations World Food Program's (WFP) response in drought-hit Ethiopia. The contribution from China will enable WFP to provide specialized treatment for more than 277,000 moderately malnourished children and women due to the ongoing drought that affected parts of the east African country. La Yifan, the Chinese Ambassador in Ethiopia, said during the handing over ceremony that China is a friendly country, providing support to its best ability. "We are a developing country, but we obliged to provide assistance to other countries through the World Food Program," he said. The ambassador appreciated efforts made by the Ethiopian government to reach out...
(AFP (eng) 04/28/17)
Pope Francis flies to Egypt Friday for a visit aimed at fostering reconciliation with the Muslim world against the backdrop of recent jihadist attacks on the Middle East's biggest Christian community. The 80-year-old pontiff is due in Cairo around 1400 (1200 GMT) and his 27 hours on Egyptian soil will include a meeting with the grand imam of the Al-Azhar mosque, sealing a recent improvement in relations between Catholicism and the Sunni branch of Islam. Security will be extremely tight...
(AFP (eng) 04/27/17)
Dimming the lights on their patrol boat, Tunisian coastguards stand in silence scanning the sea for speedboats on clandestine missions to and from Italy. Smuggling gangs are using high-performance vessels to ferry people, drugs and cigarettes across the Strait of Sicily, a distance of just 95 miles (150 kilometres). Commander Mohamed Naceur Saadani says their use of speedboats is a "new and dangerous" phenomenon. Standing on the bridge of a patrol boat capable of 40 knots (about 70 kilometres, 45 miles per hour), he monitors a bank of glowing radar screens.
(Voice of America 04/27/17)
Ten trucks carrying much-needed food for Burundi are back in Rwanda's capital after authorities denied entry at the border, citing security concerns. The World Food Program in Burundi says the trucks, carrying 300 tons of beans to feed Congolese refugees and other WFP recipients, were stopped at the border last Friday and returned Tuesday to the Rwandan capital, Kigali. Police spokesman Pierre Nkurikiye defended the decision to deny entry, saying Rwanda has been the source of crime and "insecurity" for Burundi since 2015. "If today, there are objects or people coming from the same area
(Voice of America 04/27/17)
The World Bank is distancing itself from reports that it has given a grant to the government of South Sudan worth tens of millions of dollars. A World Bank spokesperson in Ethiopia told VOA's South Sudan in Focus on Wednesday that the bank had proposed to donate $50 million to U.N. aid agencies combating famine and food insecurity, but that those funds were still pending approval from the board. Finance Minister Stephen Dhieu Dau told Reuters on Monday that the...
(AFP (eng) 04/26/17)
The UN-backed Libyan government has asked the EU for a long list of equipment, including large patrol boats, to help stem the tide of African migrants fleeing to Europe, EU diplomatic sources said Wednesday. The European Union launched Operation Sophia in 2015 to crack down on people smugglers, but because it cannot operate in Libyan territorial waters it is also trying to boost the coast guard through training and supplying basic equipment. So far its efforts have made little headway, with the Libyan government beset by Islamic militias and warlords who have been fighting for control since the West ousted long-time dictator Moamer
(Reuters (Eng) 04/26/17)
The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.
(AFP (eng) 04/26/17)
Raj Panjabi, who fled to the United States to escape civil war in his native Liberia, eventually returned to his shattered homeland to find rural communities desperate for adequate health care. The trained physician co-founded Last Mile Health in Liberia, which aims to recruit, train, equip and manage people in communities to serve as local health care workers. He spoke about his organization Tuesday at the TED Conference famous for "ideas worth spreading," sharing his dream of revolutionizing health care...
(AFP (eng) 04/26/17)
Three suicide bombings rocked the northeast Nigerian city of Maiduguri on Wednesday, killing one civilian militia member and injuring several others, security personnel told AFP. The bombings came two days after multiple suicide attacks near the strategic city that killed four members of the civilian joint taskforce (JTF) and injured two others. "There have been three suicide bombings in the city this morning in which one civilian JTF was killed and one other wounded," a senior military officer, who asked not to be identified, said. In the first blast, a female suicide bomber struck near a sprawling camp for displaced people in the Muna
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
Sudan's pro-government journalists' union on Tuesday urged Khartoum to expel Egyptian reporters from the country after Cairo refused entry to two Sudanese journalists who had travelled to Egypt. The call comes with Khartoum and Cairo trying to improve their ties, which deteriorated after Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir accused Egyptian intelligence services of supporting opposition fighters. The Sudanese Journalists' Union said Cairo had denied entry to two Sudanese journalists and deported them back home, and in response it demanded the expulsion...
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
The 22-year-old South African man on trial for murdering his wealthy family with an axe was taken on Tuesday to the home where his parents and brother were killed. Henri van Breda is accused of hacking his parents, Martin and Teresa, and his brother Rudi to death at the house on an exclusive golf estate in Stellenbosch outside Cape Town. When his trial opened on Monday, van Breda denied the murders and said he had fought off a masked intruder who broke into the four-bedroom family home.
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
Tunisia's parliament voted on Tuesday to ease the country's harsh law on drugs, in a move that could see offenders like youths caught smoking marijuana escape jail terms. The North African country has faced mounting calls from rights groups and civil society to reform the law. Tuesday's vote comes after the National Security Council headed by President Beji Caid Essebsi announced in March measures to limit the number of drug-users sent to prison. Law 52, dating back to the rule...
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
Key dates in the history of Uganda's brutal Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), which the United States and Uganda have decided to stop hunting down, saying the rebels have been neutralised. One of Africa's longest-surviving rebel groups, the LRA has terrorised parts of central Africa for 30 years, becoming notorious for mutilations, massacres, kidnappings, and the forced enrolment of children. - January 1987: a year after the takeover of Uganda by rebel leader Yoweri Museveni, voodoo priestess Alice Auma Lakwena takes up arms to topple the new regime. Her Holy Spirit Movement is defeated at the end of 1987. - 1988: Joseph Kony, presented as Lakwena's cousin...
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
At least 26 people were killed and many others injured in a head-on crash between a bus and a truck on the highway between Nairobi and Kenya's second city Mombasa, police said Tuesday. "It was a very bad head-on collision. We lost 26 people in the accident," Leonard Kimaiyo, police chief for the southern town of Kibwezi said. Another senior officer said the bus, heading to Mombasa, was overtaking several vehicles when it collided with an oil tanker. Kenya has...
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
At least 20 people, the vast majority of them women, were killed when a wooden boat capsized off the coast of central Senegal in a delta region popular with tourists, firefighters told AFP on Tuesday. A traditional wooden boat overturned near the coastal town of Bettenty on Monday night, with 72 on board, all except two of them women, said Commander Oumar Kane, a senior official with Senegal's national firefighters. "Unfortunately, we have 20 dead bodies and one missing," Kane...
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
International judges on Monday unsealed an arrest warrant for Libya's former security chief, accusing him of carrying out war crimes in 2011 to quash opposition to late dictator Moamer Kadhafi. The warrant, first issued in 2013 by the International Criminal Court (ICC), charges Al-Tuhamy Mohamed Khaled, once head of Libya's internal security agency, with three charges of war crimes and four crimes against humanity. The announcement comes as the court is still in a legal tug-of-war with Libyan authorities to transfer Kadhafi's jailed son Seif al-Islam to the tribunal in The Hague to face trial for crimes against
(AFP (eng) 04/25/17)
A Cameroon military tribunal on Monday jailed a Radio France International correspondent to 10 years in prison for what it said was his "failure to denounce acts of terrorism." Amnesty International quickly condemned Ahmed Abba's sentence -- he was further convicted of "laundering the proceeds of terrorist acts," and was fined a sum equivalent to around 85,000 euros. The journalist faces an additional five years' jail if he fails to pay. His defence team said they would appeal. Abba had...
(AFP (eng) 04/24/17)
A woman died Monday in a stampede at a border crossing between Morocco and Spain's North African territory of Ceuta, the second such death in weeks, media and activists said. Thousands of people, mainly women, work as porters transporting goods across the border, sometimes making several return trips a day and carrying up to 70 kilos (155 pounds) on their backs. "This morning there was a crush on the Moroccan side," Mohamed Benaissa of the Northern Observatory for Human Rights...
(AFP (eng) 04/24/17)
Four people were killed in two separate suicide attacks in northeast Nigeria on Monday, local militia members said, in the latest violence blamed on Boko Haram Islamists. Babakura Kolo, who assists the military with security against the jihadist insurgents, said the first incident occurred in Mammanti village, 15 kilometres (10 miles) east of Maiduguri. "Three female suicide bombers were intercepted by the vigilantes while trying to sneak into the village around 5:00 am (0400 GMT), just as the morning prayers were about to start," he told AFP. "Two of the bombers blew themselves up while the third was shot dead by a soldier before

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