Saturday 23 September 2017
(AFP (eng) 10/24/13)
TUNIS, October 24, 2013 (AFP) - One of Tunisia's main opposition parties on Thursday ruled out participating in negotiations to end months of political deadlock without the government giving a written promise that it will quit. "Nidaa Tounes believes it is not feasible for the dialogue to begin... without a formal and written commitment by the government to resign," said the party headed by ex-premier Beji Caid Essebsi, who is an outspoken critic of ruling Islamist party Ennahda. The opposition is demanding that the Ennahda-led government give a clear commitment to step down within three weeks of the start of negotiations, to make way for a caretaker cabinet of independents. The national dialogue due to start on Wednesday faced fresh...
(AFP (eng) 10/24/13)
SIDI BOUZID, October 24, 2013 (AFP) - The funerals of six policemen killed in clashes with gunmen in central Tunisia will take place on Thursday in the five different towns they hailed from, officials said. The latest deadly violence, which erupted in the central Sidi Bouzid region on Wednesday and which the authorities blamed on "terrorists," comes a week after two policemen were killed in similar circumstances and amid rising anti-government sentiment within the security forces. Five burials are expected in Sidi Bouzid and in Kasserine near the Algerian border, with the sixth funeral to be held in Kef in northwestern Tunisia. A military source in Kasserine said the families of the victims were refusing the presence of government representatives...
(BBC News Africa 10/24/13)
Tunisia's president has announced three days of national mourning for eight officers killed by suspected militants in the central Sidi Bouzidi province. President Moncef Marzouki was speaking on the second anniversary of the country's first free elections. Earlier, PM Ali Larayedh confirmed the government would resign after talks with the opposition on appointing a caretaker administration were complete. The negotiations are aimed at ending months of political crisis in Tunisia. The prime minister said his moderate Islamist-led government was committed to the "principle of relinquishing power in line with the different phases envisaged in the roadmap". "We will not submit to anyone except the interests of the country," he said. His address came after thousands of anti-government protesters marched through...
(AFP (eng) 10/23/13)
TUNIS, October 23, 2013 (AFP) - Seven Tunisian police were killed in clashes with gunmen Wednesday, as the country waited for the government's expected resignation and the launch of talks on ending months of political deadlock. Fighting erupted in the central Sidi Bouzid region, when members of the National Guard raided a house where the militants were holed up, a police source told AFP. In addition to the seven police killed, two gunmen also died in the ensuing firefight, state television reported. In the meantime, a keenly awaited speech in which Islamist premier Ali Larayedh was expected to announce his government's intention to step down under the terms of a deal with the opposition was heavily delayed. And the hard-won...
(AFP (eng) 10/23/13)
TUNIS, October 23, 2013 (AFP) - Tunisia's ruling Islamists and opposition were to begin hard-won negotiations on Wednesday to end months of political deadlock, with Prime Minister Ali Larayedh expected to announce his government's resignation. Ahead of the long-awaited national dialogue, which mediators hope will mark a crucial step in the country's democratic transition, rival protests are planned in the capital's central Habib Bourguiba Avenue, epicentre of the January 2011 revolution. A coalition of secular opposition parties has called a demonstration early afternoon to demand the immediate departure of the government led by ruling Islamist party Ennahda, which it accuses of clinging to power. Separately, the League for the Protection of the Revolution, a controversial pro-government militia, has urged supporters...
(BBC News Africa 10/23/13)
At least seven police have been killed in Tunisia in clashes with Islamist militants, reports say. A heavy exchange of gunfire was reported in the central region of Sidi Bouzid and at least two militants were also reported killed. The violence came as the Islamist-led government and opposition began talks to end months of political crisis. Thousands of anti-government protesters marched through the capital, Tunis, calling on the prime minster to resign. Parliament speaker Mustapha Ben Jaafar said he expected PM Ali Larayedh to announce his intention to stand down. A coalition led by the moderate Islamist Ennahda party was elected in 2011. Last month Ennahda agreed in principle to relinquish power, in an effort to end Tunisia's political deadlock...
(Voice of America 10/23/13)
TUNIS — Thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital on Wednesday chanting for their government to step down, hours before ruling Islamists and opposition leaders were to start talks aimed at end months of political crisis. The moderate Islamist party Ennahda has agreed that the government it leads will resign in three weeks and make way for a non-partisan administration until new elections in the country where the “Arab Spring” revolts began in 2011. The small North Africa country has been on edge since July when Islamist militants killed an opposition leader, sparking street rallies that threatened a democratic transition once seen as a model in an unstable region. Ennahda has agreed to step down after the negotiations to form...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/23/13)
UNITED NATIONS | (Reuters) - The African Union and Kenya asked the U.N. Security Council on Tuesday to defer the trials of Kenya's leaders at the International Criminal Court for one year so they can deal with the aftermath of the Nairobi mall attack. In a letter to the council obtained by Reuters, African leaders said the legal proceedings against President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto "will distract and prevent them from fulfilling their constitutional responsibilities, including oversight for national and regional security affairs." Kenyatta and Ruto face charges of crimes against humanity related to the violence that followed Kenya's 2007 elections, in which 1,200 people died. Both deny the charges and have tried to have the prosecutions...
(Voice of America 10/23/13)
Aid group Save the Children is highlighting progress in combating child mortality in many developing nations in Africa, while also warning of the need to address inequalities to help children have a better chance of surviving. The group issued a new report Wednesday saying the world has made "remarkable" improvements in child health, but that kids in poor and rural areas, as well as girls and infants, remain more at risk of dying. Its profile of Ethiopia spotlights the divide. The country has cut child mortality by 67 percent since the United Nations set a target to cut child moratlity by that rate worldwide by 2015. However, Save the Children says kids in the poorest 40 percent of Ethiopia's population...
(BBC News Africa 10/23/13)
South Korea's largest tobacco company has promised to change an advertising campaign after accusations of racism. Posters promoting a new line of cigarettes featured pictures of monkeys dressed as news reporters, declaring "Africa is coming!" The cigarettes are part of a new This Africa line. The company, KT&G, says they contain African tobacco roasted and dried in a traditional fashion. The cigarette packets contain images of monkeys roasting tobacco.'Mocking Africa'. "We are deeply offended by KT&G's shameless and insulting use of this mocking imagery," said the African Tobacco Control Alliance in a statement calling for the withdrawal of the ad campaign, saying it was "at a minimum culturally insensitive". Cigarette ad featuring a monkey in South Korea Ads for This...
(Voice of America 10/22/13)
The international human rights N-G-O, Light for the World, dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through community rehabilitation, announced an alliance that will focus on giving a voice to people with disabilities in developing nations. The group says it has received a declaration of support from its newly formed international board of ambassadors, who have pledged to work towards creating an inclusive society for people who are treated as outcasts because of a disability. Light for the World says on average persons with disabilities and households with a disabled member experience higher rates of deprivations including food insecurity, poor housing, and lack of access to water and sanitation. Gabriel Muller is director of public relations and international alliances for Light...
(BBC News Africa 10/21/13)
Tunisian security forces have killed at least nine suspected Islamist militants who are blamed for a deadly attack on a police patrol, officials say. They say at least three other suspects were arrested in the operation in the Mount Taouyer area, about 70km (44 miles) west of the capital, Tunis. Two policemen died when they were attacked in the area on Thursday. Interior Ministry spokesman Mohamed Ali Aroui said the militants belonged to the Salafist Ansar al-Sharia group. The group has been declared a terrorist organisation by the government and the interior ministry spokesman told reporters on Saturday that the three-day operation "has been a success". About two tonnes of materials used to make explosives were also seized. The killing...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/21/13)
TUNIS | (Reuters) - Tunisia's Prime Minister Ali Larayedh said Islamist militants are exploiting anarchy in neighboring Libya to get training and smuggle weapons across North Africa's porous borders. His coalition government is grappling with an Islamist militant group known as Ansar al-Sharia, which is one of the most radical to emerge since Tunisia's 2011 uprising against autocratic President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali Ben Ali. Security is a sensitive matter for Larayedh's ruling moderate Islamist party, Ennahda, which has agreed to step down in three weeks to end months of unrest set off by the assassination of two secular leaders by Islamist militants. As well as Ansar al-Sharia, North Africa is home to al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/21/13)
ROME | Mon Oct 21, 2013 (Reuters) - More than 100 survivors of a shipwreck in which hundreds of African immigrants died burst through the gates of a holding center on the Italian island of Lampedusa on Monday in a protest against the refusal of authorities to allow them to attend a funeral ceremony for the victims. The survivors of the October 3 disaster tried to catch a ferry to the Sicilian city of Agrigento, where an official ceremony was held 200 km (125 miles) from the island, Italy's southernmost point. When an interior ministry official denied them permission to board the ferry, the protesters sat down in front of the tiny island's town hall, blocking a main roads. "One...
(The Guardian 10/21/13)
For too long the status quo has been to simply make knowledge available. But that's not enough, data must also be actionable. Nathaniel Manning reiterates the importance of open data. It is paramount to share data throughout the development sector, most importantly getting it into the hands of the technologists in the developing world. The sector would benefit tremendously by embracing a collaborative, open development model in which not only financial and human capital is shared with the developing world but also the rich value of information capital. Open data has a multiplier effect for development. The original work creates the benefit that it was specifically intended to do, and opening up the data produced from that work ignites entrepreneurship,...
(Sunday Independent 10/20/13)
Johannesburg - This week, for a second consecutive year, the Mo Ibrahim Foundation’s committee of eminent persons resolved there was no African leader deemed worthy of the $5 million (R49m) Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. It is the fourth time there has been no winner in its seven-year history. As in previous no-awards years, the decision has been met with curiosity and derision. There’s no denying the prestige, if not the quantum, of the award for recipients. Comprising $5m over 10 years and $200 000 annually for life thereafter, as well as a possible $200 000 extra each year towards the winner’s philanthropic activities, it is a substantial award. Mo Ibrahim, the Sudanese-British mobile communications entrepreneur and billionaire,...
(The New York Times 10/19/13)
FORT RILEY, Kan. — Here on the Kansas plains, thousands of soldiers once bound for Iraq or Afghanistan are now gearing up for missions in Africa as part of a new Pentagon strategy to train and advise indigenous forces to tackle emerging terrorist threats and other security risks so that American forces do not have to. The first-of-its-kind program is drawing on troops from a 3,500-member brigade in the Army’s storied First Infantry Division, known as the Big Red One, to conduct more than 100 missions in Africa over the next year. The missions range from a two-man sniper team in Burundi to 350 soldiers conducting airborne and humanitarian exercises in South Africa. The brigade has also sent a 150-member...
(CNN 10/18/13)
October; (CNN) -- Two Tunisian national guard officers were killed and another was wounded Thursday in clashes between government forces and an "armed terrorist group" in the turbulent North African nation, a state-run news outlet reported. The fighting occurred in Gbollat in the northern part of the country. The Interior Ministry said forces are conducting searches and are working to arrest militants.
(AFP (eng) 10/18/13)
TUNIS, October 18, 2013 (AFP) - Angry members of the security forces on Friday drove Tunisia's President Moncef Marzouki and Prime Minister Ali Larayedh away from a memorial ceremony for two slain policeman, an AFP photographer said. The security force members, some of them in uniform, shouted "Get out" at the Tunisian leaders, obliging them to leave the official ceremony at the military barracks in the Tunis suburb of L'Aouina. Marzouki and Larayedh, as well as parliamentary speaker Mustapha Ben Jaafar, left after about 20 minutes of jeers from the crowd, without any of them addressing the gathering. "We won't accept the presence of politicians," shouted one of the protesters, who carried placards demanding laws to protect the police. Only...
(Zimbabwe Independent 10/18/13)
The frosty relations between the International Criminal Court (ICC), which came into force on July 1 2002, and African leaders show signs of further deterioration with African leaders accusing The Hague of employing double standards against Africans. The conflict was sparked in July 2008 when the then prosecutor Moreno Ocampo applied for a warrant of arrest for Omar Al-Bashir, the sitting President of the Republic of Sudan. Al-Bashir was charged with war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide in the Darfur region of South Sudan. Since establishment, the office of the prosecutor (OTP) of the ICC has investigated eight cases involving alleged violations of international criminal law. Each of these investigations is related to situations in African countries, namely the...

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