Tuesday 17 October 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 10/16/17)
TUNIS (Reuters) - Tunisia’s navy said on Sunday it recovered 10 more bodies of Tunisian migrants who drowned when their boat sank last week in a collision with a navy vessel off the country’s coast, bringing the death toll from the incident to 18. Last Monday, the navy recovered eight bodies after the collision with the Tunisian navy boat 54 km (33 miles) off the southern coast, while 38 were rescued. According to testimony from survivors, there were between 70 and 80 people on board, the International Organization for Migration has said. The incident has caused anger in Tunisia. The families of some migrants who drowned protested in two towns. In the southern town of...
(AFP (eng) 10/12/17)
Relatives of Tunisians who drowned after a migrant boat collided with a navy vessel at the weekend set fire to a local government building Thursday in protest, officials and an NGO said. Interior ministry spokesman Yasser Mesbah said around 40 Tunisians torched the building in the central town of Souk Lahad and tried to set on fire a police station. Police fired tear gas to disperse the protesters, he said. At least eight migrants drowned on Sunday after their boat sank following a collision with a Tunisian navy vessel in the Mediterranean, while 38 others were rescued, the defence ministry has said. NGOs say around 40 more people are still missing. Romdhane Ben Amor, of the Tunisian Forum for Economic...
(AFP (eng) 10/10/17)
Tunisia said on Tuesday it had released two siblings detained after their brother Ahmed Hanachi stabbed two young women to death in the French city of Marseille this month. Moez and Amina Hanachi, who both live in Tunisia, were detained on Friday and have been questioned by anti-terror investigators, the prosecution said. But the two "had nothing to do" with their brother's attack in France, prosecution spokesman Sofiene Sliti said Tuesday. The investigating judge overseeing the case therefore decided to release them after questioning, he said. Their brother Hanachi, 29, attacked two women at Marseille's Saint-Charles train station on October 1 before being shot dead by troops.
(AFP (eng) 10/10/17)
A brother and sister of Ahmed Hanachi, who stabbed two young women to death in the French city of Marseille this month, have been detained in Tunisia, authorities said Monday. The two were detained on Friday and have been questioned by anti-terror investigators, prosecution spokesman Sofiene Sliti said. "They appeared before an investigating judge... who decided to transfer the case to the national guard" in Aouina, northeastern Tunis, he said. A source close to the family named the siblings as Moez and Amina Hanachi, who both live in Tunisia. Their brother Ahmed Hanachi, 29, attacked two women...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/10/17)
TUNIS (Reuters) - Tunisia’s navy rescued almost 100 migrants from a sinking boat off its southeast coast late on Monday, authorities said, hours after eight people being smuggled to Europe drowned in the same stretch of water. The incidents coincided with the launch of joint patrols by the Tunisian and Italian navies to stem migrant flows and carry out search and rescue operations in the area, the Tunisian Defense Ministry said. Tunisia’s coast has become the launch pad of choice...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/10/17)
PARIS (Reuters) - Swiss police have detained two Tunisians wanted in connection with a deadly knife attack at Marseille train station in France on Oct. 1, a source close to the investigation said on Tuesday. The knifeman, 29-year old Ahmed Hannachi, was shot dead by a French soldier after killing two young women outside the station in southern France. Authorities are investigating the attack as a “probable” terrorist act. The two Tunisians were arrested in Chiasso, near the Swiss-Italian border,...
(AFP (eng) 10/09/17)
At least eight migrants have drowned after their boat sank following a crash with a Tunisian navy vessel in the Mediterranean, the defence ministry said Monday. Spokesman Belhassen Oueslati told AFP that eight bodies were found and 38 people rescued after the unidentified boat "collided with a military vessel" Sunday evening when it was approached some 54 kilometres (33 miles) off the islands of Kerkennah. Search operations to find any more missing people were "still ongoing", he said. Several Italian...
(APA 10/05/17)
APA-Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) - The African Union (AU) will on Thursday endorse reports and recommendations on Agriculture, Rural Development, Water and Environment (ARWE) made by experts and senior officials in a meeting held on Monday and Tuesday. The endorsement will take place during the ministerial session of the AU’s Specialized Technical Committee on ARWE that opened on Thursday in Addis Ababa under the theme “Improve environmental sustainability and transform agriculture to ensure food and nutrition security.” These include policy papers...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/02/17)
TUNIS (Reuters) - The Tunisian navy rescued 98 Tunisians fleeing to Europe when their boat started to sink off Kerkenah on the southeast coast late on Saturday, the national guard said. Separately, the army said it had arrested 43 illegal migrants rescued from four boats off Zarzis, also on the southeast coast. Tunisia has been praised for its democratic progress after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali but successive governments have failed to create jobs for young...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/02/17)
PARIS (Reuters) - The man suspected of carrying out Sunday’s attack in the French city of Marseille, killing two people, had presented a Tunisian passport when last stopped by police in Lyon just two days earlier, said the Paris public prosecutor Francois Molins. Molins told a news conference that the suspect’s details came up on criminal databases and that he went by seven different identities - none of which were on French anti-terrorist check lists. He added that one such...
(Middle East Monitor 09/26/17)
Mauritania and Tunisia will meet today in the Moroccan capital Rabat to discuss steps to prevent torture in North Africa. The meeting has been organised by the Association for the Prevention of Torture (APT) and the National Council of Human Rights of Morocco (CNDH). The Mauritanian delegation led by the president of the institution concerned, Mohamed Lemine Ould Haless, left the capital Nouakchott on Monday for Rabat. The Rabat meeting will bring together representatives from the prevention of torture committees in Morocco, Mauritania and Tunisia with the aim of “creating cooperation and exchange links” between the participating countries as well as to uncovering the “main challenges facing these
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
Tunisia’s navy rescued 78 migrants including two girls after their vessel en route to Europe took on water off the coast of Chebba and was stranded for three days, the defense ministry said on Friday. Human traffickers increasingly use Tunisia as a launch pad for migrants heading for Europe after Libya’s coastguard aided by armed groups tightened its controls. “Naval forces rescued 78 illegal Tunisian migrants 70 kilometers east of the coast of Chebba on board a boat that was...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
From deadly droughts and destroyed crops to shrinking water sources, communities across sub-Saharan Africa are struggling to withstand the onslaught of global record-breaking temperatures. But the dangers do not end there. Rising heat poses another threat - one that is far less known and studied but could spark disease epidemics across the continent, scientists say. Mosquitoes are the menace, and the risk goes beyond malaria. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which spreads debilitating and potentially deadly viruses, from Zika and dengue...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/21/17)
Makers of generic AIDS drugs will start churning out millions of pills for Africa containing a state-of-the-art medicine widely used in rich countries, after securing a multi-million dollar guarantee that caps prices at just $75 per patient a year. Global health experts hope the deal will help address two looming problems in the HIV epidemic - the rising threat of resistance developing to standard AIDS drugs, and the need for more investment in manufacturing capacity. Bill Gates’ charitable foundation will...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/18/17)
Hundreds of Tunisians protested on Saturday in the streets of the capital against a widely contested new law that grants officials from the former regime involved in corruption amnesty from prosecution. Tunisia’s parliament on Wednesday approved a law protecting officials accused of graft during the rule of autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali, triggering angry protests by the opposition and activists. Waving flags and banners saying “No to forgiveness”, “Resisting against mafia rule”, around 1,500 people marched through the capital’s central...
(The Associated Press 09/15/17)
Tunisia's Parliament has adopted a hotly disputed law giving amnesty to thousands of people linked to corruption under its former authoritarian regime. Hundreds of demonstrators protested outside the legislature saying they fear a return to Tunisia's pre-Arab Spring past. After an unusually angry debate and opposition walkout over the measure, it passed by 117 votes to nine in a Wednesday night vote. The full amnesty only concerns those who followed orders from corrupt leaders but did not make personal gains. Those who made money off corrupt dealings can pay back embezzled sums, along with a penalty, in exchange for freedom from prosecution. President Beji Caid Essebsi
(AFP (eng) 09/14/17)
Tunisia has abolished a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims, the presidency said Thursday. "Congratulations to the women of Tunisia for the enshrinement of the right to the freedom to choose one's spouse," presidency spokeswoman Saida Garrach wrote on Facebook. The announcement comes a month after President Beji Caid Essebsi called for the government to scrap the ban dating back to 1973. Until now a non-Muslim man who wished to marry a Tunisian woman had to convert to Islam and submit a certificate of his conversion as proof. Human rights groups in the North African country had campaigned for the ban's abolition...
(Bloomberg 09/11/17)
The South African companies that dominate the U.K.’s growing private hospital industry are counting on more people like Katie Corrie. A children’s party entertainer, Corrie opted to use 13,000 pounds ($17,000) of her savings and inheritance to get a hip replacement rather than spend months on a National Health Service waiting list. Britons like her are forking out almost 1 billion pounds a year to cover their own medical expenses, a trend that’s giving at least one industry the scope...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/09/17)
The figures jumping from a small boat into the clear shallow waters and running ashore on an Italian beach look like troops practicing a D-Day-style landing, but this is no drill, and these are not soldiers. The images, caught on camera, show what has become a increasingly common sight on the beaches of Italy’s southern islands - migrants from Africa landing in broad daylight. “In the past these boats came at night,” said Claudio Lombardo, the local head of the Mareamico (Friend of the Sea) environmental group who filmed the scene on a beach near Agrigento in Sicily on Wednesday morning.
(APA 09/08/17)
Deprivation and marginalization, underpinned by weak governance, are primary forces driving young Africans into violent extremism, according to a comprehensive new study by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the first study of its kind. Based on interviews with 495 voluntary recruits to extremist organizations such as Al-Shabaab and Boko Haram, the new study also found that it is often perceived state violence or abuse of power that provides the final tipping point for the decision to join an extremist...

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