Monday 11 December 2017

Does Cash Aid Help The Poor — Or Encourage Laziness?

Does Cash Aid Help The Poor — Or Encourage Laziness?
(NPR 08/11/17)
Does Cash Aid Help The Poor — Or Encourage Laziness?

You don't have to convince Likezo Nasilele that giving people a small but steady stream of cash with no strings attached may be the smartest way to fix poverty.

Just a few years ago Nasilele and her husband, Chipopa Lyoni, couldn't even afford to feed their four children properly. Then Nasilele, who lives in a rural village in Western Zambia, lucked into an experimental government program that has provided her with up to $18 every other month. In the 2 1/2 years since, she and her husband have more than doubled the money by using it to start several businesses.

"We've crossed from poverty to a better life," marvels Nasilele. "We're set up now!" Hundreds of other families in the experimental program tell a similar story.

So you'd think Zambian officials would be eager to scale up the program. And to a large extent they are. The government is now expanding cash aid to cover the entire country.

But there's a catch. Nasilele's family would not be eligible for the nationwide version of the program.

Instead, the government is reserving the money for people who really can't work — the elderly, the sick, single moms with lots of kids. They're not going to give it to the kinds of families that made up the vast majority of the 1,250 households in the pilot program: families where there's both a mom and a dad, who are able-bodied.

That option was considered too controversial, explains Esther Ngambi, the official in charge of the new cash program.

"Everybody would be saying that you're trying to give money to lazy people — that you're encouraging laziness," Ngambi says.

For years, evidence has been mounting about the effectiveness of cash aid over traditional aid to the poor such as food or seeds or job training. But Zambia's experience suggests that when it comes to persuading governments to adopt the approach, evidence might not be enough. Zambia's study — which spanned five years, analyzed data from 5,500 households and cost about $5 million — is one of the most significant to date. And the country's commitment to pouring its own resources into cash aid has established it as a leader of one of the most intriguing trends in the fight to conquer poverty. Yet this is also a tale of how gut feelings about which poor people deserve our help, and which do not, can be so entrenched they led a government to ignore the most powerful lesson of its own experiment.

"I've never seen impacts so large in my life"

When the possibility of cash aid was first floated in Zambia, it seemed totally implausible. The year was 2009. Cash aid had already emerged as a hot idea among social scientists who research anti-poverty efforts. Nongovernmental groups had launched some small-scale efforts to do it in Zambia. And some of the donors involved, including UNICEF and the German and British governments, were pushing Zambia's leaders to try cash aid in a bigger way.

But Zambian officials were wary of giving people money with no strings attached. "People would say, you're just putting money into a bottomless pit," recalls Ngambi. There was concern that people would squander the money on vices, she says. For instance, "that men will be using the money for beer." And even if people used the money for legitimate needs like food, the assumption was that as soon as they spent it they'd be right back where they started and would need more help — making cash aid an unsustainable drain on Zambia's budget.

Still, officials in Ngambi's ministry, which administers social welfare programs, were intrigued enough to set up two pilot programs. The first gave the money to any mother of a young child. This was the program Likezo Nasilele signed up for. The second targeted people who were somehow incapacitated, meaning that working was more difficult for them, if not impossible — such as the disabled or elderly people caring for orphaned relatives.

Then officials commissioned a study of these pilots from one of the premier researchers on the subject, Ashu Handa, an economist and professor at the University of North Carolina. Handa runs a center called the Transfer Project that specializes in studying cash aid programs using the gold-standard of social science research — a randomized controlled trial in which you compare what happens to people who get the cash to an otherwise identical group of people who don't. He's done studies like this across Africa. But Handa says the experiment that Zambian officials asked him to design broke new ground.

That's because previous research had primarily focused on whether people spend the money responsibly: Do they tend to buy more alcohol and tobacco? (As a rule, they don't.) Do they tend to eat better and keep their children in school? (Generally, they do.)

But Zambian officials also insisted on checking "that in fact the money is used not just responsibly but actually productively." In other words, are people able to invest it in ways that make them more money — maybe even grow the wider economy?

To answer that question, Handa collected a wealth of data on recipients' economic activities: How much more did they invest in their farms? Did they buy more livestock? Did they hire others to help with the farm work? How much did they produce? And did they open other businesses not related to farming?

A few years later, in 2014, those results started coming in. "Holy smoke!" says Handa. "They were incredible." In both versions of the program, the recipients managed to boost their spending, which is effectively a measure of their income, by more than 50 percent over what the government had given them. In other words, if they got $100 over the course of a year in handouts, they spent an extra $200 above what they had been spending before — proof that they were using the free money to make more money.

And the benefits spilled over into the local economy. The beneficiaries spent their extra income at local shops. A related study by the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization estimated that, as a result, shopkeepers and business owners saw their profits go up by 50 percent.

These kinds of returns are head and shoulders above what you generally get from traditional aid, says Handa. "I mean, I've never seen impacts so large in my life."

There were two ways that the recipients used the cash to get ahead. In families led by people who were unable to work, they mainly used the money to hire others to help them farm their land more productively. But the young families — because they were able-bodied — did something that Handa argues is remarkable, and even more promising when it comes to growing Zambia's economy long term: They became entrepreneurial.

"We're on another level now"

Take Nasilele and her husband. They live in a tiny village called Yuka, in a round hut made of sticks and mud. Before the cash program, the couple mostly worked day jobs in construction, pulling in about $30 a month. Not even enough to cover basics like soap or shoes or food, says Nasilele.

"We would have one meal a day and maybe in between we would just have mangoes from our tree," she recalls. "The thing that saved us were our mangoes." Read more at: http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/08/09/542357298/cash-hando...

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