| Africatime
Sunday 26 March 2017
(BBC News Africa 11/30/16)
Princess Kasune is one of Zambia's most outspoken HIV activists and was elected as an opposition MP in August. She tested positive to HIV in 1997 and the next year went public about her status, defying her husband - and traditional taboos - in doing so. "I felt like a ray of light had hit me after testing positive and I shouted 'Praise God!'. Such a reaction was not humanly possible even for me to understand but I looked at it as an avenue to change the lives of others," the 40-year-old told the BBC. "When I realised that I was HIV-positive, I realised that I had a responsibility to spread the news from how it can be contracted, how...
(Lusaka Times 11/30/16)
The Bank of Zambia has taken possession of Intermarket Banking corporation Zambia limited with immediate effect.This is according to to a press statement released o the media by Bank of Zambia Head of communications. Intermarket Banking Corporation has become the first victim of the Bank of Zambia stringent capital adequacy requirement which has forced the bank to become insolvent. The development has now forced the Central Bank to announce its takeover of Intermarket Banking Corporation. In 2012, the PF Government raised the minimum capital requirement for both local and foreign commercial banks to K104 million from K12 million and K520 million, respectively. But most banks especially foreign owned ones operating in Zambia have been struggling to meet the minimum capital...
(Xinhuanet 11/30/16)
Over 250 women security officers from 37 countries across Africa attending Africa Regional Convention of Women in Security Organs here vowed to step up efforts to stamp out gender-based violence (GBV) in the continent. The convention, organized according to the Kigali International Conference Declaration (KICD), was designed to redraw strategies for women officers to play their role in the fight against crimes, especially child abuse and violence against women and girls. At the two-day event that opened Monday, the women officers from police, military and prison services called for more workshops and regular conferences and establishing anti-GBV centers in all member countries of KICD. They also called for prioritizing countries that need more attention in fighting violence against women and...
(Xinhuanet 11/29/16)
Authorities in Zambia have started implementing a law banning the movement of public vehicles at night as a way of curbing road accidents, the country's road safety agency said on Tuesday. The Road Transport and Safety Agency said the law restricting the movement of public vehicles at night came into effect on Monday, November 28, 2016. The road safety agency has since reminded all operators and members of the public to adhere to the ban as it was now law, adding that failure to adhere to the law will attract a three month imprisonment, according to a statement. Among vehicles not allowed to move between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m. include locally and foreign registered public service vehicles, passenger and...
(Xinhuanet 11/29/16)
Zambia has arrested 19 suspects for various wildlife offenses following operations conducted last week, the country's wildlife agency said on Tuesday. The operations resulted in the confiscation of a pair of hippo teeth, two leopard skins, 1.5 kilograms of grysbok meat, three kilograms of hippo meat, and 3.5 kilograms of common duiker meat, according to the National Parks and Wildlife Department. The operations, conducted in various parts of the country, also saw the confiscation of six muzzle loading guns, two shotguns and five wire snares, it added. According to the wildlife agency, investigations have revealed that poaching was still on the increase, adding that a lot of big cat skins were being recovered because the poachers were using food poisoning...
(Xinhuanet 11/29/16)
A court in Zambia on Tuesday jailed a famous journalist to two years with hard labor over the production of an infamous political documentary which vilified then opposition leader Michael Sata in the run-up to the 2011 general elections. Chanda Chimba (III) was sent to jail after the court found him guilty of producing the defamatory "Stand Up for Zambia" documentary in 2010 and 2011 which was aired on state television and two other private television stations. He was also found guilty over a charge of disposing of property suspected to be proceeds of crime. The court however acquitted former Information and Broadcasting Minister Ronnie Shikapwasha and former permanent secretary in the same ministry Sam Phiri who were arrested together...
(Xinhuanet 11/29/16)
Experts in capital markets are advocating the acceleration of the bourses markets across Africa in order to drive economic growth on the continent. Speaking at the opening of Africa securities exchanges conference in the Rwandan capital Kigali on Monday, experts emphasized that capital markets are becoming more important to African economies because they help raise funds for long term investment which will drive Africa into middle income status. Rwanda hosts the 20th African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA) annual conference from November 27 to 29 dubbed: "The Road to 2030: Making the African Capital Markets Relevant to the Real Economy." The three-day meeting has brought together more than 300 global and regional experts and stakeholders in capital markets, regulators, law firms...
(Washington Post 11/28/16)
Following his release after 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela made sure one of his first trips abroad was to Havana. There, in the Cuban capital in 1991, Mandela lavished his host, Fidel Castro, with appreciation. Castro, said Mandela, was a “source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people.” The scene might seem paradoxical in some corners of the West. How could the global symbol of African liberation and democracy say such a thing about a man whose death last Friday provoked exiles who fled repressive Cuban rule to dance in Miami's streets? How could Mandela — imprisoned by South Africa's apartheid rulers — find common ground with Castro, who cleared his way to absolute power in Cuba by jailing untold...
(AFP (eng) 11/26/16)
Back in the 1970s at the height of the Cold War, the small Caribbean nation of Cuba went to war thousands of miles away in the battlefields of Angola and Ethiopia, leaving thousands dead. Cuban leader Fidel Castro, who died late Friday, was convinced that the global stage for the "world revolution" was happening in Africa -- and thus Cuba became the first Latin American nation to go to war outside its own continent. Angola and Ethiopia soon became symbols of the "regional conflicts" of the Cold War, in which Washington and Moscow battled for ideological supremacy and power through proxy wars. But Havana's involvement in the fighting fields far from home was to cost it dear. Some 4,300 Cubans...
(Agence Ecofin 11/25/16)
Zambia’s chamber of mines announced on November 24, 2016, that the country’s copper output should increase by 4% to 740,000 tons this year. While government forecast an output of 700,000 t for 2016 and 1 million tons for 2017, CEO of Chamber of Mines, Talent Ng’andwe said these forecasts had been scaled up due to operations at a new mine owned by Canadian firm First Quantum Minerals. Ng’andwe indicated that the country could have produced way more than the 740,000 tons expected if not for the power deficit which forced some mines to bring down their production. Moreover, the president of the Chamber of Mines, Nathan Chishimba said Zambia should change its fiscal regime to attract more investors into the...
(Agence Ecofin 11/25/16)
To conserve biodiversity and enhance socio-economic growth, governments of sub-Saharan Africa must consider a priority the management of their land resources, said environmental experts at the end of the 10th meeting of ministers of natural resources of East and Southern countries in Kigali on November 21 and 22. “The two-day ministerial conference provided a platform for engagement among government officials in the Eastern and Southern African region involved in land administration and spatial planning on challenges and opportunities in land, urban and territorial planning,” Xinhua reported. The forum which focused on identifying means to integrate technologies in land management in order to boost economy, protect the environment and efficiently manage lands in the region, was a wake-up call for officials...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/24/16)
A mother and her four-year-old daughter who were separated after fleeing the threat of female genital mutilation (FGM) in Ivory Coast may be reunited in Italy before Christmas after a stroke of luck allowed police to trace the woman, authorities said. The girl, identified only as Oumoh, is one of at least 20,000 unaccompanied minors who have reached Italy this year from war-torn and poverty-stricken countries mainly in Africa and the Middle East. She arrived on the southern Italian island of Lampedusa on Nov. 5 after being rescued from a rickety boat by the coastguard, police said. "She was quite traumatized, and initially wouldn't speak or communicate," Marilena Cefala, the head of Lampedusa's reception center, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation...
(The Guardian 11/23/16)
Rulers of the DRC, Burundi, Zimbabwe and others say tide has turned after Obama’s efforts to promote democracy abroad. As the sun rose over Kinshasa on 9 November, Martin Fayulu was awoken by a phone call from a relative in the US telling him to switch on his television – Donald Trump appeared set to become the next US president. Fayulu, an opposition politician at the forefront of recent protests calling for elections to be held on time in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, immediately switched on a French channel. “Many Congolese were watching, and a lot had mixed feelings,” he said. Across Africa the interest was equally intense, with the surprise result prompting fierce speculation about the unexpected...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/22/16)
African states failed on Monday to halt the work of the first U.N. independent investigator appointed to help protect gay and transgender people worldwide from violence and discrimination. The 47-member U.N. Human Rights Council, based in Geneva, created the position in June and in September appointed Vitit Muntarbhorn of Thailand, who has a three-year mandate to investigate abuses against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people. In an unusual move, African states put forward a draft resolution in the 193-member U.N. General Assembly third committee, which deals with human rights, calling for consultations on the legality of the creation of the mandate. They said the work of the investigator should be suspended. However, Latin American countries, supported by Western...
(News24 11/21/16)
Zambia's opposition, the Green Party, has criticised President Edgar Lungu's move to have his salary cut by half, saying that it was "delusional" as it "meant nothing" for Zambians. Reports over the weekend indicated that Lungu had asked that his salary be cut by half, as part of the government-led austerity measures. Deputy President Inonge Wina told parliament on Friday that Lungu would reduce his monthly salary which was currently pegged at $45 000 a month by at least 50%. She said that the Lungu led government was serious about reviving the struggling southern African country's economy.
(BBC News Africa 11/21/16)
A human rights scholar and lawyer in Lusaka says the Football Association of Zambia should go ahead and include a non-discrimination clause in their constitution. Faz is in the middle of a constitutional review process aimed at aligning its statutes with world governing body Fifa. A draft constitution circulated by Faz to its members reads: "Discrimination of any kind against a country, private person or group of people on account of race, skin colour, ethnic, national or social origin, gender, language, religion, political opinion or any other opinion, wealth, birth or any other status, sexual orientation or any other reason is strictly prohibited and punishable by suspension or expulsion." Passing this constitutional change would seemingly put the football association at...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/16)
The number of HIV-infected people taking anti-retroviral medicine has doubled in just five years, the UN said Monday, while highlighting high infection rates among young African women. A new report by UNAIDS said it was on course to hit a target of 30 million people on ARV treatment by 2020. "By June 2016, around 18.2 million people had access to the life-saving medicines, including 910,000 children, double the number five years earlier," UNAIDS said in a statement. But the report showed the huge risks that some young women face. Last year more than 7,500 teenagers and young women became infected with HIV every week worldwide, with the bulk of them in southern Africa. "Young women are facing a triple threat,"...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/16)
Above the sacks of seeds and coal, three kerosene lamps gather dust in the tiny shed that Kenyan chicken farmer Bernard calls home. He prefers to use solar energy to light up his evenings, listen to the radio or watch television, after abandoning a diesel generator he said was expensive to maintain and burned fuel too quickly. "Solar panels are a good, cheap solution," he told AFP. Across the continent, consumers are opting for their own off-grid solar solutions to power homes and small businesses, even as African governments unveil massive new solar projects seemingly every month to expand their grids. According to International Energy Agency projections, almost one billion people in sub-Saharan Africa will gain access to the grid...
(The Guardian 11/19/16)
At COP22, the African Development Bank’s president, Akinwumi Adesina, tells of strategies to improve energy supplies and fight the impact of climate change “We lose 5% of our potential GDP every year, and African industries cannot be competitive without access to electricity,” says Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank. “I believe that’s why we can’t break away from reliance on exporting our raw materials – new industries will only go to where there’s power.” He is speaking on the sidelines of the COP22 climate change conference in Marrakech, which ends on Friday. Adesina and colleagues from the bank have been using the conference to highlight its new initiatives on energy, including the New Deal on Energy for Africa,...
(AFP (eng) 11/17/16)
African leaders met in Morocco Wednesday on the sidelines of UN climate talks to agree a joint stance to fight global warming on the continent. "Africa is paying a heavy price over the climate issue and is without doubt the continent worst affected," Morocco's King Mohammed VI told the summit attended by 20 African leaders. "These disruptions... greatly hamper Africa's development and gravely threaten the basic rights of tens of millions of Africans," he said. He said the continent needed to "speak in a single voice, demand climate justice". France's President Francois Hollande and UN chief Ban Ki-moon also attended the summit which took place alongside the COP22 climate change conference in Marrakesh. Ban said Africa was at the forefront...

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