Wednesday 21 February 2018
(Reuters (Eng) 11/22/17)
HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe’s former vice president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is expected to be sworn in as president following the resignation of Robert Mugabe, will return home on Wednesday, a ruling party ZANU-PF official said. Mnangagwa, whose sacking this month prompted the military takeover that forced Mugabe out, was expected to land in Zimbabwe at 1130 GMT, Larry Mavhima, an ally of the former vice president, told Reuters. Mnangagwa, 75, who fled from Zimbabwe in fear of his safety after being sacked this month, could be sworn in as president later on Wednesday or on Thursday and is likely to lead ZANU-PF into elections next year. Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe’s president on Tuesday, a week after the army and his...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
The United States said Tuesday that President Robert Mugabe's resignation offers Zimbabwe's people a "historic opportunity" for change and could help end its isolation on the world stage. Washington has been reluctant to call the military takeover that acted as a catalyst for the longtime ruler's resignation a coup, and seized on his departure to try to turn a page. "With the resignation of Robert Mugabe, today marks a historic moment for Zimbabwe," US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said, as jubilant crowds took to the streets of Harare. "We congratulate all Zimbabweans who raised their voices and stated peacefully and clearly that the time for change was overdue," he said. "Zimbabwe has an extraordinary opportunity to set itself on...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
After Robert Mugabe's resignation as president of Zimbabwe, his former deputy Emmerson Mnangagwa, whose sacking led to the autocrat's downfall, seems likely to be the next head of state. On Sunday, Mnangagwa was named president of the ruling ZANU-PF party in place of Mugabe. That put him one step away from the top job as Mugabe was told to quit or be forced from office. Nicknamed "Ngwena" (The Crocodile) because of his fearsome power and ruthlessness, the 75-year-old Mnangagwa had appeared to have been outfoxed by Mugabe's wife, Grace. The first lady, who is 41 years younger than her husband, lobbied the veteran head of state to ditch his vice president, a long-serving lieutenant, to further her own political ambitions...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
Hundreds of Zimbabweans who fled their homeland for South Africa during the despotic rule of Robert Mugabe took to the streets of Johannesburg to celebrate the resignation of the hated president. Blowing vuvuzelas, waving Zimbabwean flags and stamping their feet, Zimbabweans danced their way through Hillbrow, a cosmopolitan Johannesburg neighbourhood with a strong community of African immigrants. "We want to go back home, even tomorrow, even now at night. I'm very happy," Nikiwe Khumalo, 60, told AFP, 36 years after leaving Zimbabwe "to find food" in neighbouring South Africa. In the years that followed his coming to power in 1980, Mugabe set his country...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
British Prime Minister Theresa May said Robert Mugabe's resignation on Tuesday gave Zimbabwe "an opportunity to forge a new path free of the oppression that characterised his rule," and declared Britain stood ready to help. "In recent days we have seen the desire of the Zimbabwean people for free and fair elections and the opportunity to rebuild the country’s economy under a legitimate government," she said in a statement. "As Zimbabwe's oldest friend we will do all we can to support this, working with our international and regional partners to help the country achieve the brighter future it so deserves." Mugabe, who had led Zimbabwe since independence from Britain in 1980, resigned as president on Tuesday as parliament began impeachment...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
The African Union has welcomed Robert Mugabe's decision to step down as president of Zimbabwe, saying the people had expressed their will for a "peaceful transfer of power." AU commission chairperson Moussa Faki Mahamat said he "welcomes the decision by President Robert Mugabe to step down from his position as Head of State following a lifetime of service to the Zimbabwean nation." "President Mugabe will be remembered as a fearless pan-Africanist liberation fighter, and the father of the independent Zimbabwean nation," he said in a statement released late Tuesday. After dominating nearly every aspect of Zimbabwean public life for decades, the 93-year-old's tenure on Tuesday ended in an announcement at a special...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
Car horns blared and cheering crowds waving the national flag thronged the streets of Zimbabwe's capital Harare on Tuesday after news broke that President Robert Mugabe had resigned after 37 years in power. The announcement came after days of mounting pressure on the 93-year-old leader, whose long and authoritarian rule made him feared by many of his citizens. "We are just so happy that things are finally going to change," Togo Ndhlalambi, 32, a hairdresser, told AFP. "We woke up every morning waiting for this day. This country has been through tough times." After a week of political turmoil, Zimbabweans reacted with shock, disbelief and delight. "I am so happy that Mugabe is gone, 37 years under a dictatorship is...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
Here are some key dates in the life of Grace Mugabe, wife of resigned president Robert Mugabe, whose ambitions to succeed him largely led to a military takeover. - July 23, 1965: Grace Marufu is born in South Africa. - 1996: Aged 31, she marries Robert Mugabe, 72, for whom she had been working as a secretary and having an affair. The couple already have two children. - 2002: She is included in an EU asset freeze and visa ban against members of Zimbabwe's political and military elite. The United States also imposes a visa ban. - 2009: Grace Mugabe allegedly assaults a British journalist trying to photograph her leaving a Hong Kong hotel. She is granted diplomatic immunity from...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Robert Mugabe resigned as president of Zimbabwe Tuesday, swept from power as his 37-year reign of brutality and autocratic control crumbled within days of a military takeover. The bombshell news was delivered by the parliament speaker to a special joint session of the assembly which had convened to impeach Mugabe, 93, who has dominated every aspect of Zimbabwean public life since independence in 1980. It was greeted on the streets of the capital Harare with car horns and wild cheering. "I Robert Gabriel Mugabe in terms of section 96 of the constitution of Zimbabwe hereby formally tender my resignation... with immediate effect," said speaker Jacob Mudenda, reading the letter. "My decision to resign is voluntary on my part. It arises...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Zimbabwe's parliament opened a session on Tuesday to begin the process of impeaching President Robert Mugabe, which could lead to him being stripped of office, an AFP correspondent saw. Parliament speaker Jacob Mubenda gave permission for a joint session of the House of Assembly and the Senate to debate a motion that would trigger impeachment proceedings against Mugabe. "This motion is unprecedented in the history of post-independence Zimbabwe," Mubenda declared. Lawmakers from across the political spectrum have called on Mugabe to quit after the military seized power and tens of thousands of citizens took to the streets to demand the 93-year-old's resignation.
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Angolan President Joao Lourenco said he and South African President Jacob Zuma would fly to Zimbabwe on Wednesday following talks between regional leaders on the crisis engulfing the country. "(South African) President Jacob Zuma and I have agreed to visit Harare tomorrow," Angolan President Joao Lourenco told journalists Tuesday after a meeting of the southern African regional bloc in Luanda. The two leaders will represent the 15-nation Southern African Development Community (SADC) bloc of which their countries are the leading members.
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Most Zimbabwean ministers stayed away from a cabinet meeting on Tuesday called by embattled President Robert Mugabe, who is facing impeachment proceedings, state media reported. "Cabinet meeting called this morning by President Mugabe failed to take off after Ministers snubbed the sitting," the state-run Herald news site reported. Lawmakers of Mugabe's once-loyal ZANU-PF party were to meet parliamentarians from other parties at 1215 GMT to trigger proceedings that could see the president stripped of office.
(Reuters (Eng) 11/21/17)
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Zimbabwe’s longstanding government and ruling party mouthpiece, The Herald newspaper, has abruptly changed its tune on President Robert Mugabe’s wife Grace, confirmation of her political downfall. The Herald often takes its marching orders from the information ministry. And it has always reported from the point of view of the winning faction in the ruling ZANU-PF, making it a reliable barometer of someone’s political standing. In August, the paper ran a typically fawning portrait of Grace under the headline “A Loving Mother of the Nation.” “Loving mother, compassionate philanthropist, astute businesswoman, perceptive politician, remarkable patriot, these are all adjectives that can be used to describe the First Lady Dr Grace Mugabe,” The Herald gushed. Less than three months...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe came under increasing pressure to quit Monday as his ruling party said it would move to impeach him and the army revealed his likely successor would soon return to the country. In a televised address late Sunday, the 93-year-old president had flouted expectations he would step down after the military's takeover, pitching the country into a second week of political crisis. Lawmakers from his ruling ZANU-PF party said that they would take the first steps on Tuesday to force Mugabe from office after he ignored their ultimatum to resign. "We want to get rid of this animal called Mugabe. We have the numbers, the opposition is also going to support us,"...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Zimbabwe's influential war veterans on Tuesday called for immediate protests against President Robert Mugabe as parliament moved to impeach the veteran leader. "All the people must leave what they are doing, come to Harare... we just want to see the back of Mugabe immediately. The protests must begin now, we cannot have another hour of Mugabe," said Zimbabwe War Veterans' Association chairman Chris Mutsvangwa. The group urged people to march to Mugabe's private residence, known as the Blue Roof, to ensure the increasingly isolated leader "leaves office immediately". Lawmakers from Mugabe's ruling ZANU-PF party are due to take the first steps on Tuesday to force Mugabe...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Zimbabwe's parliament prepared to start impeachment proceedings against President Robert Mugabe Tuesday, as ousted vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa, who could be the country's next leader, told him to step down. Further street protests have been called in Harare, raising fears that the political turmoil could spill into violence. Mnangagwa, seen as the preferred candidate of the military chiefs who took power last week, said he would only return to Zimbabwe when he his safety was guaranteed and he would not face arrest. Mnangagwa's intervention -- his first since the army seized control -- comes as lawmakers of Mugabe's once loyal ZANU-PF party were to meet in parliament at 1215 GMT to trigger proceedings that could see the president stripped of...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/17)
Thirty-seven years ago, Robert Mugabe was feted as a titan who had won Africa's last great war against colonialism. Today, in the twilight of his life, Mugabe finds himself loathed by millions of his citizens for a rule tarnished by despotism, cronyism, corruption and economic ruin. Deserted by the forces that propped up his power for decades, Mugabe now faces the humiliation of impeachment proceedings launched by the ZANU-PF -- the party he had forged into a tool of unquestioning loyalty. Mugabe was born on February 21, 1924, into a Catholic family at the Kutama Mission, northwest of Harare -- a city then called Salisbury, capital of the white-ruled British colony of Rhodesia. As a child, Mugabe was a loner...
(AfricaNews 11/21/17)
The African Union has called for an investigation on the Libyan authorities regarding the ‘slave markets’ of African migrants in the conflict torn nation. The Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Professor Alpha Conde, strongly condemned the despicable acts which are at odds with the ideals of the Founding Fathers of the Organization and relevant African and international instruments, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. He calls for an immediate end to these practices and other criminal acts of human trafficking. He calls for a swift action to be taken and identify all perpetrators and accomplices, with the view of bringing the criminals to justice. This comes following the release of shocking images showing the sale of...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/17)
Zimbabwe's ruling ZANU-PF party will launch the parliamentary process on Tuesday for impeaching President Robert Mugabe, a government lawmaker told AFP. The decision on Monday came after Mugabe missed a deadline to resign given to him by his party over the weekend. Once a simple majority of parliamentarians vote for impeachment, an investigative committee is formed by lawmakers, who report back to both houses of parliament. Each house must then vote by a two-thirds majority for him to be stripped of office. "We are expecting the motion to be over (Tuesday)," said ZANU-PF lawmaker Paul Mangwana, referring to the initial procedure to commence impeachment proceedings.
(AFP (eng) 11/20/17)
Branding President Robert Mugabe a dark force who threatened their future, several hundred Zimbabwean students on Monday added their voices to the clamour for the 93-year-old autocrat to quit. Classes at the University of Zimbabwe in Harare were cancelled and examinations postponed as students raged over Mugabe's insistence on staying in office, defying opposition from the military, his party and the public. Mugabe's critics blame him for the country's decades-long economic collapse, widespread state-sponsored rights abuses and the crumbling education system. But emotions are spilling over after a weekend of officially-encouraged protests stoked hopes he would quit -- which were then dashed by his TV address on Sunday that simply ignored the resignation demands. "Mugabe must pave the way for...

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