Wednesday 25 April 2018
(AFP (eng) 11/24/17)
Nicknamed "the Crocodile" for his ruthlessness, Emmerson Mnangagwa who took over Friday as Zimbabwe's president, is a hardliner with ties to the military who could prove as authoritarian as his mentor Robert Mugabe. It was his driving ambition to take over as leader which set off a bitter succession battle with Mugabe's 52-year-old wife Grace, triggering the crisis that toppled the long-serving president, who resigned on Tuesday. When Mnangagwa was dismissed as vice president by Mugabe on November 6, it initially looked like he'd been outfoxed by the first lady, forcing him to flee the country. But the situation quickly turned on its head, with his dismissal triggering a military takeover and mass street protests, which ended with Mugabe's ouster...
(AFP (eng) 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe's Emmerson Mnangagwa was set to be sworn in as president on Friday, marking the final chapter of a political drama that toppled his predecessor Robert Mugabe after a military takeover. Mnangagwa, until recently one of Mugabe's closest allies, will take the oath of office at the national sports stadium on the outskirts of Harare before thousands of supporters, dignitaries and foreign diplomats. Snipers took up positions around the stadium amid tight security as jubilant Mnangagwa supporters streamed in, with many dancing as music played. "We are excited and expecting a lot from Mnangagwa.
(The Associated Press 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe’s new President Emmerson Mnangagwa vowed Friday he will work to reduce crushing unemployment and return the country to prosperity after years of decline, as the nation cheered a new beginning after the extraordinary exit of Robert Mugabe. “Our economic policy will be directed for job, job, job creation,” Mnangagwa told the crowd of 60,000 witnessing his inauguration at a stadium in the capital, Harare. Zimbabwe’s unemployment rate is estimated to be 80 percent. “We must work together. You, me, all of us who make up this nation,” Mnangagwa said, urging the millions of frustrated Zimbabweans who have left the country to return. Mnangagwa, fired earlier this month as vice president, takes power after the whirlwind events that ousted the...
(AFP (eng) 11/24/17)
Local residents in the rural Zimbabwean village where Robert Mugabe was born, got married, and has a house say he was a great leader -- but express sorrowful acceptance rather than anger at his ousting. Kutama, 55 miles (90 kilometres) outside the capital Harare, has been a heartland of deeply personal support for Mugabe for decades, benefiting from his patronage and much-criticised land reforms. "When I heard the news (of his exit) and seeing what was now happening in the country, and things not going right, I thought, 'Well everything has to end, he has to rest'," Johannes Chikanya, Mugabe's second cousin and a close childhood friend, told AFP. "Had it been me, I would have resigned while people still...
(BBC News Africa 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe's new President Emmerson Mnangagwa has addressed a packed stadium, vowing to serve all citizens. He said he felt "deeply humbled" to take the role. And he said he was "not oblivious to the many Zimbabweans from across the political and racial divide who have helped make this day." He paid tribute to his predecessor Robert Mugabe - to muted applause - calling him "a father, mentor, comrade-in-arms and my leader". Mr Mugabe left office dramatically this week after 37 years of authoritarian rule. His departure followed a power struggle in which Mr Mnangagwa was sacked as vice president to pave the way for Grace Mugabe, the then-first lady, to take up the presidency. Mr Mnangagwa fled the country but...
(The Associated Press 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe’s new president Emmerson Mnangagwa, widely known as the Crocodile, is seen as a smart, ruthless politician, but many question if he will be able to bring the change the country craves. “We are witnessing the beginning of a new, unfolding democracy,” the 75-year-old announced Wednesday upon his return to the country, two weeks after his firing by longtime mentor Robert Mugabe led to the president’s downfall. Despite the message of inclusion, Zimbabweans noted that Mnangagwa made his first public remarks outside ruling ZANU-PF party headquarters and, switching to the local Shona language, praised the party. They ask whether Mnangagwa will be adequately independent from ZANU-PF to revive the battered economy and restore democracy with the backing of the opposition...
(Bloomberg 11/24/17)
Skepticism that he will do so abounds. Mnangagwa, 75, was Mugabe’s right-hand man for half a century through the liberation war against white-ruled Rhodesia and since independence in 1980 until their rupture in recent months. Yet his hand may be forced by a dire economic situation: a 90 percent jobless rate and a cash shortage so severe that some people sleep near banks in the streets of the capital, Harare, to ensure they can make withdrawals. Mnangagwa addresses the people of Zimbabwe on Nov. 22.Photographer: Felix Dlangamandla/Gallo Images via Getty Images “I hope he will not continue with the usual populist noises which we’ve seen with the former government,” said Tsitsi Mushure, a 36-year-old single mother. “People need jobs, I...
(AFP (eng) 11/24/17)
China has traditionally rejected US-style interventionism, but its deepening economic involvement in volatile countries like Myanmar and Zimbabwe is thrusting Beijing towards a more assertive global role, analysts say. China's foreign policy has been guided by its principle of "non-interference in other countries' internal affairs", which emerged in 1954 when it was a much weaker nation. While Beijing remains rhetorically committed to the stance, it is now a very different power, boasting the world's largest standing army and the second biggest economy. This change has coincided with a shift in diplomatic engagement that most recently saw Beijing take the unusual step of proposing a strategy to resolve the crisis over Muslim refugees flooding over the border from Myanmar to Bangladesh...
(Xinhuanet 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe's Emmerson Mnangagwa, 75, was on Friday sworn in as the second President of Zimbabwe at a colorful ceremony attended by thousands of Zimbabweans and foreign dignitaries. He replaced former president Robert Mugabe, whose resignation Tuesday after military and public pressure put an end to his 37-year stay in power. Mnangagwa became Zimbabwe's second president since the nation attained independence from Britain in 1980. Taking his oath of office before Chief Justice Luke Malaba, Mnangagwa pledged to uphold and defend the constitution and the rights of Zimbabweans. "I will promote whatever that will advance and oppose whatever that will harm Zimbabwe. I swear that I will protect and promote the rights of the people of Zimbabwe," he said. The inauguration...
(Reuters 11/24/17)
New President Emmerson Mnangagwa laid out a grand vision on Friday to revitalise Zimbabwe’s ravaged economy and vowed to rule on behalf of all the country’s citizens. Zimbabwe's former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa arrives ahead of his inauguration ceremony to swear in as president in Harare, Zimbabwe, November 24, 2017. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko Sworn in days after the overthrow of Robert Mugabe, the 75-year-old former security chief promised to guarantee the rights of foreign investors and to re-engage with the West, and said elections would go ahead next year as scheduled. In a 30-minute speech to tens of thousands of supporters in Harare’s national stadium, Mnangagwa extended an olive branch to opponents, apparently aiming to bridge the ethnic and political divides...
(AFP (eng) 11/23/17)
Every time Chareka Mutungwazi, 76, tries to collect his pension money, he spends the night, like scores of others, sleeping outside a bank in Harare, the Zimbabwean capital. He is lucky if he is allowed to take out just $20 of his monthly $63 (53 euros) pension as banks limit withdrawals due to the cash shortage -- a symptom of the country's economic collapse. For most Zimbabweans, incoming president Emmerson Mnangagwa has only one priority: rebuilding an economy shattered by policies that threw out investors, destroyed the key agricultural sector and left almost everyone unemployed. "I have to sleep in the queue if I want to get money. I came here last night and this is not good," Mutungwazi told...
(AFP (eng) 11/23/17)
Britain's Africa minister Rory Stewart arrived in Zimbabwe on Thursday for wide-ranging talks, ahead of the inauguration of a new president following Robert Mugabe's dramatic departure. Stewart is due to meet political and business leaders, as well as human rights groups and NGOs, the UK foreign ministry said in a statement. His arrival in the capital Harare comes just days after Mugabe's resignation on Tuesday, ending his 37-year rule as MPs gathered in parliament to impeach their 93-year-old leader. Stewart described the historic change as "an absolutely critical moment" following "Mugabe's ruinous rule". "The events of the last few days have given people here real hope that Zimbabwe can be set on a different, more democratic and more prosperous path,"...
(AFP (eng) 11/23/17)
As Robert Mugabe's regime tottered and fell, one immediate benefit that Zimbabweans celebrated with glee was the sudden absence of bribe-extracting police who were a symbol of life under his rule. Endless police roadblocks were a notorious feature of every journey in Zimbabwe, with drivers reluctantly paying frequent bribes to evade long questioning over minor alleged offences. But across Harare and along major national routes, barely a single police officer has been spotted since the military took over on November 14 and forced Mugabe to step down after 37 years in power. During the turmoil, the absence of police -- and the presence of the occasional armoured military vehicle on the streets...
(AFP (eng) 11/23/17)
Even before Robert Mugabe's resignation, many Zimbabweans tempered their yearning for his downfall with the knowledge that his likely successor has a similar reputation for brutality and corruption. Emmerson Mnangagwa, who until recently was one of Mugabe's longest-serving and closest allies, will be sworn in as the new president on Friday offering Zimbabwe the chance to open a new chapter. But his career as a hardline minister in the ZANU-PF party points to a new leader who could be just as keen to suppress opposition voices, restrict freedoms and govern with an iron fist. "It's a great relief that he is out of the way, but we shouldn't get too excited about the new guy," Patrick Moyo, a 38-year-old bank...
(The Associated Press 11/23/17)
As Zimbabwe on Thursday prepared to swear in a new leader, Emmerson Mnangagwa, after 37 years, attention turned to the fate of Robert Mugabe and the wife who just days ago was poised to succeed him. The 93-year-old Mugabe, who resigned on Tuesday as lawmakers began impeaching him, has not spoken publicly since his stunning speech on Sunday night defying calls from the military, ruling party and the people to step down. Mugabe appeared to remain in the capital, Harare, with former first lady Grace, but it was not clear under what terms. A new photo circulating on social media, said to be taken this week, showed Mugabe and his wife sitting on a sofa with advisers standing behind them...
(Xinhua 11/23/17)
The African Union (AU) and European Union (EU) have welcomed the resignation of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on Tuesday. Tuesday's decision will go down in history as an act of statesmanship that can only bolster President Mugabe's political legacy, said Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson of the AU Commission in a statement later Tuesday. Mugabe resigned on Tuesday after pressure from the military and Zimbabweans, ending his 37-year grip on power. His resignation was greeted with wild scenes of celebration by Zimbabweans who now look forward to a new political dispensation in the country. President Mugabe will be remembered as a fearless pan-Africanist liberation fighter, and the father of the independent Zimbabwean nation, AU's statement said. Faki Mahamat noted that AU...
(RFI 11/23/17)
Zimbabwe's next President Emmerson Mnangagwa has vowed to lead the country out of economic ruin, ahead of his inauguration Friday. The former Vice president returned to Harare Wednesday, after being sacked two weeks ago, in what triggered a military takeover and the end of Robert Mugabe's near four decade rule. Nicknamed the "Crocodile" for his political shrewdness, Emmerson Mnangagwa portrays himself as a free-market enthusiast. A week before military generals took over Zimbabwe, the 75-year old penned a strongly-worded critique of former President Robert Mugabe, and the clique around him, blaming it for the country's economic collapse. Relations between the former allies have cooled significantly since their first encounter in a Zimbabwean prison cell in the 1970s. Before falling out...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/22/17)
HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe’s former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa will be sworn in as president on Friday, marking a new era for the country ruled by Robert Mugabe from independence nearly four decades ago until his swift downfall this week. The ruling ZANU-PF party has nominated Mnangagwa to fill the vacancy left by Mugabe on Tuesday and he will be sworn in on Friday, said Jacob Mudenda, the speaker of parliament. Mugabe sacked Mnangagwa as vice president two weeks ago to smooth a path to the succession for his wife Grace, who is much younger than the 93-year-old leader. Mnangagwa fled for his own safety and the military...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
Zimbabwe's former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa was to return to the country Wednesday to take power after Robert Mugabe's resignation brought a sudden end to 37 years of authoritarian rule. Mugabe's iron grip ended in a shock announcement to parliament where MPs had convened to impeach the 93-year-old who dominated every aspect of Zimbabwean public life for decades. On the streets, the news that his long and often brutal leadership was over sparked wild celebrations which lasted late into the night, with crowds dancing and cheering ecstatically amid a cacophony of car horns. "Comrade Mnangagwa is coming back today," senior aide Larry Mavhima, told AFP...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/17)
Zimbabweans waited Wednesday to discover when their new leader would be appointed after president Robert Mugabe's resignation brought a sudden end to a 37-year reign of authoritarian rule. Mugabe's tenure ended in an announcement at a special joint session of parliament where MPs had convened to impeach the 93-year-old who dominated every aspect of Zimbabwean public life for decades. On the streets, the news that his long and often brutal leadership was over sparked wild celebrations on Tuesday evening. Car horns honked and large crowds erupted into ecstatic cheers and dancing. The likely next president is Emmerson Mnangagwa, who Mugabe sacked as his deputy earlier this month in a move that pushed infuriated army chiefs to seize power and force...

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