Saturday 25 November 2017
(BBC News Africa 11/24/17)
Zimbabwe's new President Emmerson Mnangagwa has addressed a packed stadium, vowing to serve all citizens. He said he felt "deeply humbled" to take the role. And he said he was "not oblivious to the many Zimbabweans from across the political and racial divide who have helped make this day." He paid tribute to his predecessor Robert Mugabe - to muted applause - calling him "a father, mentor, comrade-in-arms and my leader". Mr Mugabe left office dramatically this week after 37 years of authoritarian rule. His departure followed a power struggle in which Mr Mnangagwa was sacked as vice president to pave the way for Grace Mugabe, the then-first lady, to take up the presidency. Mr...
(RFI 11/23/17)
Zimbabwe's next President Emmerson Mnangagwa has vowed to lead the country out of economic ruin, ahead of his inauguration Friday. The former Vice president returned to Harare Wednesday, after being sacked two weeks ago, in what triggered a military takeover and the end of Robert Mugabe's near four decade rule. Nicknamed the "Crocodile" for his political shrewdness, Emmerson Mnangagwa portrays himself as a free-market enthusiast. A week before military generals took over Zimbabwe, the 75-year old penned a strongly-worded critique of former President Robert Mugabe, and the clique around him, blaming it for the country's economic collapse. Relations between the former allies have cooled significantly since their first encounter in a Zimbabwean prison cell in the 1970s. Before falling out...
(RFI(EN) 11/17/17)
Zimbabwe's military on Wednesday denied it was staging a coup d'état after troops took control of key points of Harare overnight Tuesday. The move was targeting "criminals" close to President Robert Mugabe, the generals said, adding that the situation would return to "normalcy once [their] mission is completed". It was unclear n Wednesday moring who was behind the military action, RFI's correspondent Ryan Truscott said. "The catalyst seems to have been the sacking of Vice-President Emmerson Mngangawa last week," he...
(BBC News Africa 11/17/17)
Driving around Zimbabwe, one can hardly tell the country is in the middle of the biggest political crisis since independence. In one town, a man in his 20s invites me to his shop and tries to convince me to buy a silver necklace. "It costs $20 [£15]," he says. "But for you I can make that $15." He offers the discount rather half-heartedly. "You see, people don't want to spend money on thing like these; the economy is really doing...
(BBC News Africa 11/17/17)
Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe has made his first public appearance since the country's army took over on Wednesday. He attended a graduation ceremony in the capital, Harare. Mr Mugabe had been under house arrest for days. The army made its move after a power struggle over his successor. The military said on Friday it was "engaging" with Mr Mugabe and would advise the public on the outcome of talks "as soon as possible". Live updates from Zimbabwe Mr Mugabe was...
(La Tribune 11/16/17)
La confusion régnait encore ce matin au Zimbabwe où l’armée a pris le contrôle de la télévision publique et quadrille le quartier administratif de la capitale Harare. Un haut gradée s’est exprimé hier dans un message télévisé précisant «que ce n’est pas une prise de pouvoir militaire», mais une sorte de contre-purge. «Nous souhaitons assurer la nation que son excellence le président de la République du Zimbabwe et commandant en chef des forces de défense du Zimbabwe, le camarade RG...
(BBC News Africa 11/14/17)
Zimbabwe's army chief has warned those responsible for "purging" the country's ruling Zanu-PF party to stop, or the military will step in. The rare intervention comes just a week after President Robert Mugabe sacked his deputy Emmerson Mnangagwa. General Constantino Chiwenga, who appeared at a news conference with another 90 senior army officers, did not refer to anyone by name. Mr Mnangagwa, once seen as a successor to Mr Mugabe, has fled into exile. Africa Live: More on this and...
(BBC 10/04/17)
Zimbabwe’s Vice-President Phelekezela Mphoko has launched an unprecedented attack on the country’s other Vice-President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, accusing him of undermining President Robert Mugabe by alleging he was poisoned at a political rally in August. Mr Mnangagwa's claim was a "calculated" challenge to Mr Mugabe's "public account that Mnangagwa’s medical doctor ruled out poisoning" as the cause of his "traumatising vomiting and diarrhoea" experience at the 12 August rally, Mr Mphoko said. "There’s now little doubt, if there ever was any,...
(Voice of America 09/28/17)
Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe is lashing out against businesses that he believes are defying his orders to reverse price hikes for basic commodities. Mugabe is accusing those who defy his order of being "saboteurs" against his government, some of whom he said were from within his own ruling Zanu PF party. He promised to take corrective measures but some analysts are calling for the government to stabilize the economy, rather than blame businesses. The past two weeks have seen a...
(Bloomberg 09/27/17)
Studio 189, a label founded by actress Rosario Dawson and fashion executive Abrima Erwiah, is reinvesting in its African roots. It’s hard enough to build a fashion brand, let alone an empire. Rare is the person who makes a mission of using fashion to build communities. Such is the case with Studio 189, a label founded by longtime friends Abrima Erwiah (formerly a marketing executive at Bottega Veneta) and Rosario Dawson (an enduring star most recently seen in Netflix’s Marvel...
(Bloomberg 09/25/17)
Zimbabwe will access a $600 million credit line from African Export-Import Bank in an effort to stave off a foreign-currency shortage that’s afflicted importers of everything from food to fuel. The southern African nation needs the assistance “especially during the foreign-exchange drought, which runs from October to February next year,” Finance Minister Patrick Chinamasa said at a ceremony Saturday in the capital, Harare, where the agreement was signed by the Cairo-based lender and Zimbabwe’s central bank. Zimbabwe’s foreign-currency earnings traditionally slump after sales of tobacco end in the second half of the year and the government gears to provide inputs to farmers for crops such as corn and soy.
(Voice of America 09/25/17)
African first ladies and activists hailed progress that some governments on the continent are making on gender equality. They met on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. “We used to have 23 percent female representation in parliament but, with the stroke of a pen it went up to 48 percent. So, we managed to double our female representation with that decision,” said Namibia’s first lady Monica Geingos at a roundtable invitation-only event co-hosted by the...
(The Guardian 09/18/17)
Anna Jones says that, through selling its cocoa cheaply, Africa is exporting its wealth overseas; while Sue Banford claims that the soya moratorium in the Amazon has done nothing to halt deforestation. Only the final paragraph in your article on cocoa farming causing deforestation in Ivory Coast (Forests pay price for world’s taste for cocoa, 14 September) mentioned the most fundamental thing – the farmer’s livelihood, or lack of it. The low value of his (or more likely her) crop...
(Bloomberg 09/15/17)
Societe Generale SA, challenged on its home turf by Orange SA’s push into banking, is fighting back with a new mobile lender in Africa. The French lender started YUP, a new app for smartphones, in Senegal and Ivory Coast and plans to begin operating in four other sub-Saharan countries this year and next, the company said on Thursday. The bank aims to double its client base to 2 million in the region within three years. “Telcos have opened the way...
(Bloomberg 09/13/17)
Walking through rows of macadamia trees on her farm in eastern Zimbabwe, Shalet Mutasa proudly displays a set of soil-quality results showing the fields’ conditions are improving. This will be her third harvest of the creamy white nuts after switching from less-profitable corn. Mutasa, who is in her mid-50s and was allocated the previously white-owned land by the government, is targeting 20 metric tons of production. That’s nearly double last year’s crop and a big jump from the half a...
(The Guardian 09/12/17)
Zimbabwe first lady denies assault on Gabriella Engels, saying she was protecting herself after being attacked with knife. Zimbabwe’s first lady, Grace Mugabe, has denied assaulting a South African model in a hotel suite in Johannesburg last month, saying she acted in self-defence after being attacked with a knife. In a previously unreported deposition from 17 August, Mugabe countered the version of the incident given by Gabriella Engels to police and media. According to Mugabe, she was protecting herself after...
(Bloomberg 09/11/17)
Zimbabwe’s government is using money earned from diamond exports to fund its Central Intelligence Organisation, blamed for a raft of human-rights abuses as it’s helped to keep President Robert Mugabe in power since 1980, Global Witness said. Diamonds dug from the Marange fields in eastern Zimbabwe are channeled through Dubai, India, the Netherlands and South Africa by a complicated web of cross-owned companies based in places as diverse as Mauritius, Hong Kong and Johannesburg, the London-based group said in a...
(Bloomberg 09/11/17)
The South African companies that dominate the U.K.’s growing private hospital industry are counting on more people like Katie Corrie. A children’s party entertainer, Corrie opted to use 13,000 pounds ($17,000) of her savings and inheritance to get a hip replacement rather than spend months on a National Health Service waiting list. Britons like her are forking out almost 1 billion pounds a year to cover their own medical expenses, a trend that’s giving at least one industry the scope...
(Bloomberg 09/08/17)
Political violence has flared in Zimbabwe as the southern African nation gears up for elections next year that may see a united opposition seek to end President Robert Mugabe’s near four-decade rule. The Zimbabwe Peace Project recorded attacks on 745 people last month, up from 435 in July. The ruling party, military, police and intelligence services were responsible for 94 percent of the assaults, according to the human-rights group, which is based in the capital, Harare, and has 420 observers...
(Bloomberg 09/07/17)
African Rainbow Minerals Ltd., the miner chaired by South Africa’s richest black businessman, will pay a record dividend this year as rising iron-ore and manganese prices boosted earnings at its ferrous unit. ARM will pay investors 6.50 rand a share, almost triple that of the previous year, and its 11th consecutive dividend, the Johannesburg-based company said in a statement Thursday. The company benefited from a 45 percent increase in prices received for exported iron ore and 93 percent more for...

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